The Coldest Village on Earth, Oymyakon

The coldest village on Earth is Oymyakon. Oymyakon is a rural locality in Oymyakonsky District of the Sakha Republic, Russia, located along the Indigirka River, 30 kilometers northwest of Tomtor on the Kolyma Highway.

Normally, It gets down to well below zero celcius in Oymyakon. Oymyakon's has lowest recorded temperature for any permanently inhabited location is -71.2C. With the average temperature for January standing at -50C, it is no wonder the village is the coldest permanently inhabited settlement in the world. It is also known as the 'Pole of Cold', 

Some of the main problem when living in Oymyakon include pen ink freezing, glasses freezing to people's faces and batteries losing power.

Although there was coverage for mobile phone reception the phones themselves would not work in such cold conditions.

A single shop provides the town's bare necessities and the locals work as reindeer-breeders, hunters and ice fisherman. 

No attached Bathrooms and homes still have outside toilets.

Nothing grows so reindeer meat, raw flesh shaved from frozen fish, and ice cubes of horse blood with macaroni are a few local delicacies. But they never suffer malnourishment.

Locals keep their cars running all day for fear of them not starting again if turned off.

Another problem caused by the frozen temperatures is burying dead bodies. Digging graves for a funeral can take up to three days as ground has to be thawed with hot coals. The earth must first have thawed sufficiently in order to dig it, so a bonfire is lit for a couple of hours. Hot coals are then pushed to the side and a hole couple of inches deep is dug. The process is repeated for several days until the hole is deep enough to bury the coffin.

This is a Heating Plant in Oymyakon. Most people still burn coal and wood for heat. When coal deliveries are irregular the power station starts burning wood. If the power ceases, the town shuts down in about five hours, and the pipes freeze and crack.

This is a Fuel Station in Oymyakon.